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The student news site of De Smet Jesuit High School

The Mirror

The student news site of De Smet Jesuit High School

The Mirror

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Blood drive set for Friday

Jordan+Ramsey-Williams+El+24++gets+his+blood+checked+by+a+Mercy+Hospital+technician+before+donating+on+Nov.+3%2C+2022.+This+years+fall+blood+drive+will+be+on+Nov.+3.+
Evan Proost
Jordan Ramsey-Williams El ’24 gets his blood checked by a Mercy Hospital technician before donating on Nov. 3, 2022. This year’s fall blood drive will be on Nov. 3.

Stucco will work in collaboration with Mercy to host a blood drive on Nov. 3 in the gym from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., with hopes of surpassing their average of 40 donors.

Donating once could potentially save up to 3 lives.

“You’re basically saving the lives of people in need,” director of student activities Michael Russo said. “It really brings in our motto of being men for others.”

In order to donate, you must be 17 years or older, 16 with parental permission, and sign up for a time slot. However, freshmen can help out by using their study hall to volunteer. Students need to show a photo ID and the last 4 digits of their Social Security to give.

“A lot of young people might be scared of it, but it is worth it and not as hard as it sounds,” Mr. Russo said. “The feeling of knowing you did something for others is great.”

Before giving blood, students must make sure that they’ve eaten breakfast and are hydrated, so their blood sugar is at a fair level.

“I know some friends who have skipped that and fainted,” five-time donor senior Cameron Jones said. “It doesn’t really hurt. You get out of class. You get to save others. It is worth it.”

It takes about 45 minutes to complete. However, the actual donation time is only around 15 minutes.

“Some of my favorite memories are giving blood myself,” Mr. Russo said. “I can no longer give blood because of my blood condition, but I loved giving the blood while I could.”

If competing within 48 hours, it is recommended that students don’t give. However, practice is fine.

Students who donate will receive a card with their blood type and a T-shirt.

“If you have a fear of needles, people will be there to help you and give you a peace of mind,” Jones said. “If you put it into a wider perspective, you might get to save people in need, it is worth the pain.”






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