Nostalgia reigns in new fall play

A look into this years play, "Leaving Iowa."

Juniors+Ryan+Hughes+and+Henry+Right+rehearse+a+scene+from+the+fall+play+%22Leaving+Iowa.%22+The+De+Smet+Dionysian+Players+will+perform+the+play+Oct.+17%2C+19-20.
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Nostalgia reigns in new fall play

Juniors Ryan Hughes and Henry Right rehearse a scene from the fall play

Juniors Ryan Hughes and Henry Right rehearse a scene from the fall play "Leaving Iowa." The De Smet Dionysian Players will perform the play Oct. 17, 19-20.

Will Hanson

Juniors Ryan Hughes and Henry Right rehearse a scene from the fall play "Leaving Iowa." The De Smet Dionysian Players will perform the play Oct. 17, 19-20.

Will Hanson

Will Hanson

Juniors Ryan Hughes and Henry Right rehearse a scene from the fall play "Leaving Iowa." The De Smet Dionysian Players will perform the play Oct. 17, 19-20.

Drew Hollman, Staff Writer

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The De Smet Dionysian Players will perform “Leaving Iowa” on Oct. 17, 19- 20.

“It centers around this family of four, in the late 60’s early 70’s and the adventures they have on summer road trips,” Theatre Director Kurt Knoedelseder said. “It jumps ahead 25 years to where the young boy in the story is a young man and goes home because his father has passed away and he thinks it’s the time to find the proper resting place for his father’s ashes.”

The show will star juniors Ryan Hughes and Henry Right. Five girls from other schools will be performing as well.

“I love working with them,” Hughes said. “I’ve worked with most of them before, and they are all fantastic actors.”

The set this year will consist of a car and a billboard that changes through the course of the play. In order to help the audience know where the family is all the time, the billboard will change with pictures or different billboards or state maps as the family travels to different places.

The set also has a car, which is made of blocks and a steering wheel. The actors will not act it out the way it a car would really be, such as not opening or closing doors or rolling down windows.

“The audience is asked to imagine the car,” Knoedelseder said, “and I think it is very accessible to kids and adults alike.”

Tickets this year cannot be purchased ahead of time. They can be purchased from assistant Director Ryan Sextro at the door for $5.

“When people see it they will reflect back on family vacations they’ve had,” Knoedelseder said, “either as kids with their parents or as parents with their kids, and went by car.”






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